E-mail: martin@martinpreshaw.com | TEL: 028 686 32087 M-F 7PM-9PM (GMT)

Handmade Uilleann Bagpipes

Nuair a théid sé fán chroí ní scaoiltear as é go bráth

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Click on image above for a slideshow.

Handmade chanters, practice sets, 1/2 sets, 3/4 sets, and full sets of Uilleann Bagpipes are available in concert D, C#, C, B, and Bb pitch. Components are fashioned from select hardwood and trimmed with faux-ivory or boxwood mounts . Metalwork is brass or 304 grade stainless steel. Custom work is accepted. All work is done in the North of Ireland, at my workshop. Private instruction is available.

"The musical instruments that are being produced in my wee workshop in Co.Fermanagh could not have been done without the the guidance, patience and encouragement of Mr. David Michael Quinn.  David, I am truly indebted to you for your friendship across all matters." -- Martin Preshaw

Pipemaker's Journal

  • 10 Dec 14

    By Martin Preshaw
    For The Pipers Review, Autumn 2007

    The past number of years has 'enjoyed' a resurgence of traditional methods, techniques and tools employed in the manufacture of the Irish Bagpipes, more commonly known as the Union Pipes or the Uilleann pipes. These most noticeably have included incorporating hollow main-stocks, hand-forged keys and hand rolled ferrules and sliders, the subject of this short article. Bores fashioned from D-bits and shell augers and reamed with handmade flat reamers and spoon reamers are common place in modern day Uilleann pipes. I believe it is important to closely observe and study period instruments that have been fashioned entirely within the walls of one musical instrument workshop utilising the tools, methods and materials of the day. However, this 21st century creation of the past in modern day folk instruments, while perhaps enjoyable as an exercise in self-indulgence for both maker and customer is quite f

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